Sign Language Basics You Can Teach Your Child

For an adult, learning sign language can seem like a daunting task. For babies however, using nonverbal communication is essential to their survival. By eight months old, babies are using gestures like pointing or rubbing their eyes to communicate their needs. This means it’s a great time to introduce some basic sign language skills to your baby. Not only will they be able to communicate with you more effectively, if they encounter sign language in the world one day, they will be better equipped to handle it.

More
This is a great sign to teach your baby–especially around the time they start eating solid foods. You can give your baby a few bites of their favorite food, and when they begin to ask for more, introduce the sign for more. Once they correctly do the sign, reward them with a happy voice and more food. The sign for “more” is fairly easy. Pinch the tips of your fingers together on both hands, and then touch your hands together. Before you know it, your child will be signing “more!”

All Done
Have you ever spent a good portion of your day cleaning food off the floor? Yeah, we’ve all been there. Teaching your baby to sign “all done” can be great for getting them to tell you when they’ve finished, instead of just throwing the food on the floor or crying. Start with your hands up flat and your palms facing you. Then simply flip your palms outward and say “all done.” You can start by doing this once you notice your child doesn’t seem hungry anymore, and follow it up by taking the plate away.

Help
It’s no secret that babies need our help a lot. They communicate that need in a variety of different ways. In some situations, it’s important we understand that our baby needs us right away. That’s why teaching the “help” sign is great for early learners. For this sign, present one hand flat out with your palm up. Then make a fist with your other hand and place it on your upturned palm. This simple sign could save you a lot of stress.

The part of the brain that deals with language development is really solidified during the first few years of life. Introducing your baby to sign language, even just the basics, at this point in their lives can have many benefits. Aside from clearly communicating with you, it’ll set them up to continue learning the language as they get older.

How to Keep Your Children Focused During Remote Learning

The COVID-19 pandemic has introduced radical changes in virtually all sectors, including education. The stay-at-home government directives have pushed schools to adopt the concept of remote learning for our children. The short attention span of children could, however, easily threaten the success of this initiative. Here are some tips on how, as a parent, you may come through for your children to help them stay focused during remote learning.

Provide the resources

The success of remote learning for children dramatically depends on the availability of the necessary resources, including laptops and internet connections. One of the essential parenting tips for distance learning requires you to provide your children with laptops or desktop computers connected to the internet. You may also have to show your children how to navigate basic computer programs essential for the remote learning sessions.

Nurture a routine

Unlike adults, children may take some time before they adapt to the discipline of unsupervised learning via the internet. To help them stay organized and disciplined, you should help them set a routine, such as a calendar or digital organizer, to keep track of daily events. The routine should match that of the digital learning program for the kids’ schools. Such a routine helps the child to keep pace with the learning program and not fall behind.

Review progress

Like in classroom-based learning, remote learning should be monitored in terms of the student’s progress. As a parent, you should supplement the distance learning program assessment by regularly checking your child’s progress. Progress review may involve doing some spot checks and asking some basic concepts taught during the remote learning sessions.

Think big

To make remote learning work for your children, you may have to come on board and help them create bigger goals and gradually achieve them. It would help if you showed your child how to look at the bigger picture regarding how the pandemic is slowly shifting the education sector’s dynamics and creating challenges. After demonstrating this, you may show the child how they can come on board and help resolve the pandemic’s problems by thinking creatively.

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